Better Homes, Better Outcomes
We believe that better homes are associated with better outcomes for children.  


Meet Maicol, age 11.  We have a relationship that goes something like this.  When he sees me, very often he will come and just give a little tug on my shirt.  And I’ll say, “What is it, Maicol?”  And he may say, “I’m hungry” or “My shoes are worn out” or “My family doesn’t have any food in the house.”  It’s humbling to ask, isn’t it?  Even for those in great need.  But when it hurts enough, you ask.  


One night Maicol tugged on my shirt, but this time he said, “Argenis (in photo below him and Maicol’s best friend), wants to ask something.”  


Argenis was sitting on a bench alone.  I sat down next to him, “Maicol says you want to ask me something.  What is it?”  What he said went like an arrow right through my heart.  “When do you suppose I can get a yellow house?”  I hugged him and said, “Argenis, we’ll build you a house.  I promise.”  And we did. 


Now I don’t know what someone else might have done, but all I know is that a little boy, 12 years old, shouldn’t have to beg for a yellow house.  It’s wrong for him to have to sleep on a roach infested mattress on a muddy floor, when I have so much . . . when I have the ability to help.  


“A house is to a family what soil is to a plant."  You can pull a plant out of the ground and put water on it and give it all the sunlight in the world, but eventually it will die because it is not rooted.“ 


It is the same with a family. A well-built house with solid walls, a good roof and a dry floor will positively affect a family.  A home means sufficient space and a healthier environment where children can focus on their studies.  One begets another.  
 
We have provided simple, decent shelter to almost 200 families in Costa Rica and over 1200 worldwide, including thousands of children.

 

Housing